Fast for Freedom: A debate (of sorts) about scientific evidence

Fast for Freedom: A debate (of sorts) about scientific evidence Sat, 23 Aug 2003 The Medical Director of the APA was unable to cite a single scientific study proving an underlying biochemical basis for any mental illness. An amazing exchange between Dr. . . . Continue reading →

AHRP Comments Re: Best Pharmaceuticals for Children’s Act of 2002

Comments submitted by The Alliance for Human Research Protection Re: Best Pharmaceuticals for Children’s Act of 2002 The National Academy of Sciences Committee of the Institute of Medicine on Clinical Research Involving Children August 18, 2003 Vera Hassner Sharav, President John H. . . . Continue reading →

Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act of 2002


Comments submitted by The Alliance for Human Research Protection
to The National Academy of Sciences
Committee of the Institute of Medicine on Clinical Research Involving Children

AHRP has been closely monitoring pediatric research trends since passage of the FDA Modernization Act of 1997. We believe that medications used in children should be thoroughly tested for safety, effectiveness and appropriate dose. But unlike adults who can exercise their autonomous right to informed consent, children who are enrolled in clinical trials are non-consensual human subjects. They should not, therefore, be made to assume the burden of testing possibly toxic drugs whose safety is unknown.

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Debate Resumes on the Safety of Depression’s Wonder Drugs – NYT

Debate Resumes on the Safety of Depression’s Wonder Drugs – NYT Thu, 7 Aug 2003 After a decade of lies, deception, and cover-up of evidence linking antidepression drugs – such as, Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft – to acts of suicide in previously non-suicidal . . . Continue reading →

A Come Back for Psychosurgery?

A Come Back for Psychosurgery? Wed, 6 Aug 2003 The Los Angeles Times reports that experimental psychosurgery is once again on the rise – at Harvard’s Massachusetts General Hospital and Brown University. It is acknowledged that “Researchers still do not fully understand . . . Continue reading →