1944–1961: Nuclear Field Tests, “Radiation bombs,” Meltdowns Endangered Americans

U.S. Air Force threw “Radiation bombs” expelled from USAF planes intentionally spread radiation to “unknown distances” endangering Americans young and old alike.

  • 1949: “Green Run” intentional radioactive contamination experiment over Hanford, WA.
    A massive intentional experiment was conducted by General Electric officials and officials from the Department of Defense (DOD) and AEC. Within seven-hours, 7,780 curies of radioactive iodine-131 and 20,000 curies of xenon-133 were released over Hanford. It was the largest single known radioactive incident. By comparison, Three Mile Island accident (1979) released between 15 and 24 curies of radioactive iodine. It remains unclear what the purpose was for exposing US citizens to this radiological warfare experiment.
  • Military “systematic radiation warfare program” spread radiation across wide areas around Oak Ridge, Tenn., Los Alamos, NM, and Dugway, Utah. The Pentagon’s aboveground nuclear bomb tests of 1945–1962, totaling more than 200, and the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, are not officially listed as radiation experiments. Yet between 250,000 and 500,000 US military personnel were contaminated during their compulsory participation in the bomb tests and the post-war occupation of Japan. (LaForge. Radiation Experiments… 2013)
  • 1954: Castle Bravo, the largest U.S. Nuclear Test in the Marshall Islands; it resulted in greater radiation exposure than planned and the miscalculation resulted in the largest U.S. nuclear contamination accident. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the severity of radiation injury. An estimated 665 inhabitants were overexposed to radiation — years later, inhabitants of the island experienced numerous health problems, including birth defects. Traces of radiation were discovered in Australia, India, Japan, the U.S. and Europe spreading roughly 7,000 square miles. (Castle Bravo. Brookings Institute. 2014)
  • In 1959, the Air Force conducted at least eight deliberate experimental meltdown in Utah dispersing 14 times the radiation released by the partial meltdown of Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania in 1979, an Associated Press reported in 1994. And in the same year, a “radiation bomb” doused Utah with 60 times more radiation than escaped the Three Mile Island accident, according to Sen. John Glenn, D-Ohio, who released a report on the program 20 years ago.
  • 1958–1962: An AEC field study — “Project Chariot” — spread radioactive materials over Inupiat land in Point Hope, Alaska. Today, cancer is the leading cause of death in Point Hope. (Alaska Dispatch, 2012)