Biochemical Weapons and Pharmaceutical Rejects Were Tested on U.S. Solders

Declassified Edgewood document AD351962 – LSD tests on “volunteers” states: “When this document has served its purpose, DESTROY it in accordance with AR 380-5. DO NOT return the document to U. S. Army Edgewood Arsenal Chemical Research and Development Laboratories.”   (David Martin. Secret Drug Experiments, CNN, 2012; includes declassified videos)

Nerve gases — including, tabon and sarin imported from Hitler’s secret biochemical weapons arsenal — and pharmaceutical rejects were tested on American soldiers. Former State Department officer John Marks, author of The Manchurian Candidate (1979) reported that Edgewood received “an average of 400 product ‘rejects’ a month from major U.S. pharmaceutical firms.” The “rejects” were “commercially useless drugs because of the demonstrated hazards and numerous undesirable effects.”

Indeed, an Edgewood officer quoted in The New Yorker, said, “The characteristics we are looking for in these agents are in general exactly opposite to what the pharmaceutical firms want in drugs that is the undesirable side effects.” Starting in 1959, phencyclidine — or PCP — which Parke, Davis & Company had marketed as an anesthetic but abandoned because patients were having hallucinations and delusions, was a tested drug of choice. At Edgewood doctors tested PCP as an aerosol and gave it to soldiers surreptitiously to see if they could then “maintain physical security over simulated classified material.” One soldier — who had been exposed to sarin gas a week earlier — was handed a glass of whiskey laced with twenty milligrams of PCP. a doctor observed “manic reaction and much hostility” before he passed out, and began breathing in a pattern associated with neurological trauma or cardiac stress.

One of these “rejects” was phenylbenzeneacetic acid (BZ) which is 10,000 times more powerful than LSD. BZ inhibits the production of hormones which aid the brain’s transfer of messages and instructions across nerve endings (synapses), thereby severely disrupting normal human perceptual, behavioral and sensory patterns. (Kreca, 2001; BZ Human Side Effects information from Peer Reviewed military experiments) The poisonous chemicals and terrifying mind-blowing drugs tested on soldiers at these facilities had no medicinal uses whatsoever; their only use is in chemical warfare. Some of these deadly agents were shipped from the Nazi arsenals. The staff assured the soldiers, “There is nothing here that could ever harm you.” However, declassified Edgewood document AD351962BZ tests in soldiers states:

“The safety factor in man cannot be stated with certainty. If man resembles most other animals in his toxicological response, the ratio of lethal to effective dose would be very high; however, there is no direct information about lethality in man.”

In 1969, President Nixon ordered an end to chemical weapons tests; but the tests continued secretly.