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  A year after professor Susan M. Reverby, a historian at Wellesley College in Massachusetts, uncovered a heinous Guatemalan syphilis experiment conducted between 1946 and 1948, on at least 5,500 under the auspices of the US Public Health Service, a hearing was held this week about the findings of the President’s Bioethics Commission investigation. The…

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The Obama Administration has embarked on an aggressive course of action that will accelerate the pace at which the integrity of American medicine–is sullied beyond repair.  

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FDA’s lax approval process for medical devices has shielded  surgeons and manufacturers who have made a killing from a lucrative business venture. FDA has even awarded the seal of approval years after the rings were implanted in patients while still in the experimental stage–without their knowledge or informed consent.

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“Do we have to wait for him to kill himself or someone else before anyone does anything?” thinking for sure someone would call me  back in the morning and re-hospitalize Dan. Unbelievably, no one responded…" Mary Weiss.

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President Obama ordered a review by his bioethics commission following the revelations that yet another experiment sponsored by the U.S. Public Health Service, was even more odious than the infamous Tuskegee Syphilis experiment. In the recently uncovered experiment, unwitting Guatemalans were deliberately infected with syphilis by the same doctor who conducted the Tuskegee experiment. Additionally,…

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The catalyst for Dr. Elliott’s article was the tragic case of Dan Markingson, a 26-year old who committed suicide in May 2004, while enrolled in the CAFE trial, prescribed Seroquel. This case encapsulates the tragic consequences of a broken system which is not designed to detect the hazards for human subjects posed by market-driven research.

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Physicians for Human Rights is the first group to argue that the presence of medical personnel who monitored the CIA’s use of torture on detainees–e.g., waterboarding, sleep deprivation and other "enhanced" interrogation techniques–rendered these medical professionals complicit in lending support to interrogation practices that were intentionally harmful.

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