Carl Elliott, MD, who has  the moral gumption to stand up and speak out against “the toads and bullies who preside over academic medical centers” — including his own institution’s deplorable, but profitable human experiments in psychiatry —  is especially revolted by the hucksters who call themselves bioethicists. In a recent post on his blog,…

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Who determines whether a medical intervention falls within the parameters of an experiment?   Historical case is examined by Maria Rentetzi, who addresses the issue in “The Women Radium Dial Painters as Experimental Subjects (1920-1990), or; What Counts as Human Experimentation?” She notes that the plight of the women and their painful abhorrent deaths, have been…

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Peter Aleff, our guest contributor whose scathing, detailed insightful critique of unethical experiments, in particular, the contentious government sponsored SUPPORT experiment that put premature babies lives and well-being at increased risk without disclosing the true nature of the experiment to the parents. Tuskegee-Style Medical Deceit Still Overrules Human Research Protections: The recent baby-suffocating SUPPORT experiment…

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“The whole discipline of biomedical ethics rises from the ashes of the Holocaust…”  Arthur Caplan The Nuremberg Code (1947) laid the foundation for biomedical ethics mandating that medical experiments conducted on human beings must conform to well-defined humane, ethical standards; foremost is immutable standard: “The voluntary consent of the human subject is absolutely essential. The…

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National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) inaugurated the “Decade of the Brain” and sponsored  Psychiatry’s Cruel and Inhumane Research Paradigm In the 1980s and 1990s increased federal funding accelerated clinical research into mental disorders. History has demonstrated that mental patients are most often exploited in experiments that disregard their safety and result in harm. A…

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1980: U.S. documents reveal criminal human experiments conducted by Japan’s Unit 731 American journalist John Powell brought to public attention the criminal human experiments conducted by Japan’s Unit 731. Citing U.S. government documents that he obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, Powell alleged that the U.S. government had pardoned the Japanese medical war criminals…

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1990: FDA issued a waiver from informed consent for military use of experimental drugs The FDA waiver from informed consent was to permit the DOD to use unapproved, experimental drugs and vaccines on enlisted soldiers—in violation of the foremost “absolutely essential” mandatory ethical principle defined by the Nuremberg Code. 1990: CDC Inoculated Black and Latino…

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1993 Kathryn Hamilton died 44 days after being enrolled in Protocol 681 at the Hutchinson Cancer Center in Seattle Siix days later, Hamilton’s doctors submitted the journal article documenting what they had known for more than a year: The primary rescue drug didn’t work. Read “Unnformed Consent,” a monumental five-part investigative series by Duff Wilson and…

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The Declaration of Helsinki defines ethical research: “In any medical study, every patient – including those of a control group, if any – should be assured of the best proven diagnostic and therapeutic method.” (1964; 1996) That standard for ethical research was reaffirmed by the World Medical Association in 2000: “The benefits, risks, burdens and…

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1998: Doing Harm: Research on the Mentally Ill, a prize winning research expose by The Boston Globe In November, 1998, the first of a four-part series by Robert Whitaker and Dolores Kong shed light on the abusive research parameters of non-therapeutic experiments conducted on mentally incapacitated individuals. They focused on several victims who had suffered and…

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1999: Experiments on the most vulnerable The research community has consistently demonstrated its disregard for individual patient-subjects’ safety.   1999: One hundred babies are test subjects of the drug, Propulsid One hundred infants were enrolled by Dr. Susan Orenstein at Children’s Hospital (Pittsburgh) in a clinical trial testing Propulsid for infant acid reflux—i.e., colic which…

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According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s own scientific assessment reports (2004, 2009), Ultrafine particles (UFP) are considered more dangerous than PM2.5. EPA has determined that UFP can cause sudden death. “there is strong epidemiological evidence linking short-term (hours, days) exposure to PM2.5 with cardiovascular and respiratory mortality and morbidity.” Yet, EPA-funded experiments were conducted in elderly…

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